A reappraisal of the “East carpathian temperate climate refugium” during the last glacial maximum
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2022-07-25 12:28
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562/569(4-924.52) (1)
Paleontologie (118)
SM ISO690:2012
CROITOR, Roman. A reappraisal of the “East carpathian temperate climate refugium” during the last glacial maximum. In: Sustainable use and protection of animal world in the context of climate change: dedicated to the 75th anniversary from the creation of the first research subdivisions and 60th from the foundation of the Institute of Zoology, Ed. 10, 16-17 septembrie 2021, Chișinău. Chișinău: Institutul de Zoologie, 2021, Ediția 10, pp. 316-321. ISBN 978-9975-157-82-7. DOI: 10.53937/icz10.2021.52
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Sustainable use and protection of animal world in the context of climate change
Ediția 10, 2021
Conferința "Sustainable use and protection of animal world in the context of climate change"
10, Chișinău, Moldova, 16-17 septembrie 2021

A reappraisal of the “East carpathian temperate climate refugium” during the last glacial maximum

DOI: https://doi.org/10.53937/icz10.2021.52
CZU: 562/569(4-924.52)

Pag. 316-321

Croitor Roman
 
Institute of Zoology
 
Proiect:
20.80009.7007.02 Schimbări evolutive ale faunei terestre economic importante, ale speciilor rare şi protejate în condiţiile modificărilor antropice şi climatice.
 
Disponibil în IBN: 25 septembrie 2021


Rezumat

The concept of “East Carpathian Refugium” is largely based on reports on temperate-climate species from the Late Paleolithic sites of Moldova. The present report proposes new faunistic data from the key Paleolithic sites of Moldova that question the presence of some temperate species in the East Carpathian Region during the Last Glacial Maximum. The revision of archaeozoological material from Cosăuți did not confirm the presence of Capreolus capreolus and Alces alces in this palaeolithic site. Osteological remains previously ascribed to Cervus elaphus, according to new data, belong to Cervus canadensis and Ovibos moschatus.