Low molecular weight gelators. Gelation ability vs. Molecular and crystal structure of the gelator
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LUBORADZKI, R.; PAKULSKI, Z.. Low molecular weight gelators. Gelation ability vs. Molecular and crystal structure of the gelator. In: Physical Methods in Coordination and Supramolecular Chemistry. XVII, 27 septembrie - 1 octombrie 2006, Chişinău. Chisinau, Republic of Moldova: 2006, p. 70. ISBN 978-9975-62-066-6.
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Physical Methods in Coordination and Supramolecular Chemistry
XVII, 2006
Conferința "The XV-th International Conference Physical Methods in Coordination and Supramolecular Chemistry : The XVII-th Reading in memory of Acad. A.Ablov"
Chişinău, Moldova, 27 septembrie - 1 octombrie 2006

Low molecular weight gelators. Gelation ability vs. Molecular and crystal structure of the gelator


Pag. 70-70

Luboradzki R.1, Pakulski Z.2
 
1 Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Polonia,
2 Institute of Organic Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
 
Disponibil în IBN: 9 iunie 2020


Rezumat

Although the last decade brought much progress in the field of low molecular mass organogelators [1], a proper design of new gelators is still a hard task or very often even a matter of chance. Gels derived from low-molecular-mass compounds have attracted special interest on account of their unique features, potential applications and simplicity of the gelator molecules. Because gelator molecules are relatively small the formation of the gel has to be based on its spontaneous self-assembly under non-equilibrium conditions such as the cooling of oversaturated solutions. During the gel formation the crosslinked fibrous structure is created, which can be observed on TEM or SEM pictures. In the case of title glucofuranose derivatives the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds is a driving force for this process [2]. The gelating abilities of sixteen compounds having the general formula as presented on Figure 1 were examinedfigureFigure 1. Investigated gelators. R1 and R2 represent aliphatic fragments with different architecture. Those compounds are able to gelatinize several organic solvents as: toluene, benzene, p-xylene, carbon tetrachloride, nitrobenzene, chloroform, alkanes and cycloalkanes, ethyl acetate, ethers, etc. The gelating abilities strongly depend on the size and character of the fragment connected to the carbon atom C2’. Saccharides containing relatively long aliphatic chains in this position exhibit a clear tendency for gelating more polar solvents. Additionally to the molecular geometry, the intermolecular interactions present in the pure crystalline gelators were analyzed. The correlation between the gelator crystal structure and its gelating ability was also examined.